SAINT OF THE DAY: SAINT DAMIEN OF MOLOKA’I’

I last took some time off when I went to Chicago and then California for Christmas 2019 but that is about to change. Covid has changed travel plans for millions of people, I’m sure, but I’m finally able to board a plane and I’ll be doing just that tomorrow, destination Chicago, with proof of vaccination and a negative Covid test.

Although I’ll be spending time with a lot of friends and relatives, the main purpose of my visit is to attend the May 15 priestly ordination and then his first Mass on May 16 of Deacon Ryan Brady, a young man I met several years ago and to whom I gave a chalice that had been in my family since 1927. I’ve told that story before on these pages: A CHALICE GOES HOME….. | Joan’s Rome (wordpress.com).

These pages may be dark for a bit but you never know when I might get the urge to post something. I will also probably update Facebook and Twitter (@joansrome and facebook.com/joan.lewis.10420) occasionally. Please say an Ave for safe travels and for the future Fr. Ryan Brady.

Today’s saint, St. Damien of Moloka’i, is very dear to my heart, as you night know if you’ve been following Joan’s Rome for some time. I’ve been to the peninsula of Kalaupapa on the island of Moloka’i many times – Kalaupapa is where the victims of leprosy were exiled for life. Over 8,000 are buried here, though many tombstones were washed away a long time ago in a tsunami. I’ve posted just a handful of photos from one visit there. Most are of the Kalawao side of the peninsula where Damien built St. Philomena church and adjacent cemetery. The tomb of the grandfather of Honolulu’s Bishop Larry Silva is on Kalaupapa.

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This is my incredible friend Audrey Toguchi whose cure of cancer through the intercession of Blessed Damien led to his canonization in 2009.

I am on the Honolulu diocesan guild for the cause of canonization of Servant of God Joseph Dutton. Joseph worked on Kalaupapa for 44 years, several years with Fr. Damien (the ‘other’ Joseph: Fr. Damien was baptized Joseph de Veuster) and then 30 years with St. Marianne Cope. Joseph Dutton has a singularly amazing story and I am honoured to be working for his cause. Will Hawaii have a third saint? Let’s see! To learn more: https://josephdutton.org

SAINT OF THE DAY: SAINT DAMIEN OF MOLOKA’I’

(franciscanmedia.org) – When Joseph de Veuster was born in Tremelo, Belgium, in 1840, few people in Europe had any firsthand knowledge of leprosy, Hansen’s disease. By the time he died at the age of 49, people all over the world knew about this disease because of him. They knew that human compassion could soften the ravages of this disease.

Forced to quit school at age 13 to work on the family farm, Joseph entered the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary six years later, taking the name of a fourth-century physician and martyr. When his brother Pamphile, a priest in the same congregation, fell ill and was unable to go to the Hawaiian Islands as assigned, Damien quickly volunteered in his place. In May 1864, two months after arriving in his new mission, Damien was ordained a priest in Honolulu and assigned to the island of Hawaii.

In 1873, he went to the Hawaiian government’s leper colony on the island of Moloka’i, set up seven years earlier. Part of a team of four chaplains taking that assignment for three months each year, Damien soon volunteered to remain permanently, caring for the people’s physical, medical, and spiritual needs. In time, he became their most effective advocate to obtain promised government support.

Soon the settlement had new houses and a new church, school and orphanage. Morale improved considerably. A few years later, he succeeded in getting the Franciscan Sisters of Syracuse, led by Mother Marianne Cope, to help staff this colony in Kalaupapa.

Damien contracted Hansen’s disease and died of its complications. As requested, he was buried in Kalaupapa, but in 1936 the Belgian government succeeded in having his body moved to Belgium. Part of Damien’s body was returned to his beloved Hawaiian brothers and sisters after his beatification in 1995.

When Hawaii became a state in 1959, it selected Damien as one of its two representatives in the Statuary Hall at the US Capitol. Damien was canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on October 11, 2009.

 

 

VATICAN INSIDER: FR. MARK LEWIS OF GREGORIAN UNIVERSITY – COUNCIL OF CARDINALS REFLECTS ON LIFE OF CHURCH IN PANDEMIC

Weekly English edition of L’Osservatore Romano: ING_2021_019_0705.pdf (osservatoreromano.va)

VATICAN INSIDER: FR. MARK LEWIS OF GREGORIAN UNIVERSITY

This week I feature Part II of my conversation with Fr. Mark Lewis, vice rector for Academics at the Jesuit-run Gregorian University in Rome. He tells us about his background and how he got to Rome and the Gregorian. He also teaches Church history at this venerable, centuries-old academic institution located in the very center of Rome.

You’ll learn about Father’s specific work at the university, how it reflects the universal Church in its teaching staff and student body and how the Greg – as we in Rome call the university – has dealt with the pandemic – everything from classes online requiring new technology to turn-styles that measure the temperature of those entering the university. I also ask Father why he thinks Pope Francis was the first ever Jesuit to be elected to the papacy when other cardinals of other orders – Dominicans, Franciscans, etc – have been elected.

By the way, many buildings in Rome are very old and have very large rooms with unusually high ceilings and nothing to soften sound waves – thus an acoustic nightmare. And that explains the echo in this and other interviews I’ve done.

IN THE UNITED STATES, you can listen to Vatican Insider (VI) on a Catholic radio station near you (stations listed at www.ewtn.com) or on channel 130 Sirius-XM satellite radio, or on http://www.ewtn.com. OUTSIDE THE U.S., you can listen to EWTN radio on our website home page by clicking on the right side where you see “LISTEN TO EWTN.” VI airs at 5am and 9pm ET on Saturdays and 6am ET on Sundays. On the GB-IE feed (which is on SKY in the UK and Ireland), VI airs at 5:30am, 12 noon and 10pm CET on Sundays. Both of these feeds are also available on the EWTN app and on www.ewtnradio.net ALWAYS CHECK YOUR OWN TIME ZONE! For VI archives: go to https://www.ewtn.com/radio/audio-archive and write the name of the guest for whom you are searching in the SEARCH box. Below that, will appear “Vatican Insider” – click on that and the link to that particular episode will appear.

COUNCIL OF CARDINALS REFLECTS ON LIFE OF CHURCH IN PANDEMIC

The Council of Cardinals discuss the impact of the Covid-19 crisis around the world, and the Church’s response to it, during a virtual meeting held on Thursday afternoon. The also continue talks on the upcoming Apostolic Constitution which will focus on the organization of the Roman Curia.

By Vatican News staff reporter

In a meeting held virtually on Thursday afternoon, members of the Council of Cardinals shared their experiences of the “economic and social consequences” of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, and discussed “the Church’s commitment to health, economic recovery and the support offered to those most in need.”

Pope Francis took part in the meeting from his residence in the Casa Santa Marta, while the other members of the Council – Cardinals Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga, Reinhard Marx, Sean Patrick O’Malley, Oswald Gracias, and Fridolin Ambongo Besungo – joined the conversation from their respective countries. Cardinals Pietro Parolin and Giuseppe Bertello, along with the council’s secretary, Bishop Marco Mellino, were connected from the Vatican. (Vatican media file photo)

After considering the current situation in their various regions, the members of the council turned their attention to the forthcoming Apostolic Constitution, which will deal with the organization of the Roman Curia. A note from the Holy See Press Office explained that the cardinals discussed “the working methodology that will have to be implemented for the revision and correction of some normative texts” after the new document takes effect.

They also addressed several “further perspectives opened up by the text under development.”

The next meeting of the Council of Cardinals is scheduled for June of this year.

MAY 12 GENERAL AUDIENCE TO BE HELD IN SAN DAMASO COURTYARD – POPE FRANCIS GREETS NEW SWISS GUARD RECRUITS – POPE’S CLOSENESS TO INDIA AS IT STRUGGLES AGAINST COVID-19

I’ve attended many Swiss Guard swearing-in ceremonies over the years, including Mass with them in the Sistine chapel on their 500th anniversary, a ceremony that took place in the Paul VI Hall when there was inclement weather and several ceremonies in the traditional San Damaso courtyard, The main ceremony for the 500th anniversary was held in St. Peter’s Square – the entire 500th anniversary was a very special celebration with a number of events. I’ve placed some of my pictures of those moments in the vaticannews article you see below. (I obviously had a better camera in the last two slideshows!)

MAY 12 GENERAL AUDIENCE TO BE HELD IN SAN DAMASO COURTYARD

The Prefecture of the Papal Household has announced that, on Wednesday May 12, the Holy Father will preside over the general audience in the San Damaso courtyard of the Apostolic Palace. By observing the health indications provided, the faithful who wish to participate will be able to enter through the Bronze Goor in St. Peter’s Square. No entrance tickets are required.

POPE FRANCIS GREETS NEW SWISS GUARD RECRUITS

Pope Francis on Thursday received 34 new members of the Pontifical Swiss Guard, ahead of their afternoon swearing-in ceremony, telling them that the qualities of courtesy and helpfulness in their work “are a beautiful testimony and a sign of the Church’s welcome.”

By Vatican News staff reporter

Greeting the 34 new Swiss Guards and their families in the Vatican on Thursday, the Pope recalled the history of the Corps and the work many young men have carried out with commitment and fidelity that continues today.

He also spoke of members of the Guard that “have gone so far as to sacrifice their own lives to defend the Pope.”

500th Anniversary celebration of the Swiss Guards –

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Vocation of the Swiss Guard

Pope Francis noted that many people have a calling in life, which means that some men have a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life. Others, he said, “follow the conjugal vocation and form their own families.”

Addressing the new recruits, the Pope said, “With you, I thank the Lord, the source of all good, for the various gifts and vocations He has entrusted to you, and I pray that those who are now beginning their service may respond fully to Christ’s call, following Him with faithful generosity.”

He also expressed his appreciation that young people “choose to dedicate some years of their lives in generous service to the Successor of Peter and to the ecclesial community.”

Swearing-in ceremony in the Paul VI Hall –

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Thank you

During his greeting to the new recruits, Pope Francis took the opportunity to publicly thank “all the members of the Swiss Guard for their diligent service.”

“I greatly appreciate your ability to combine professional and spiritual aspects, thus expressing your devotion and fidelity to the Apostolic See,” he said.

Important qualities

The Pope went on to say that those pilgrims and tourists who come to Rome “have the opportunity to experience the courtesy and helpfulness of the guards at the various entrances to Vatican City. Never forget these qualities, which are a beautiful testimony and a sign of the Church’s welcome.”

Traditional ceremony in the San Damaso courtyard –

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Concluding his address, Pope Francis extended his good wishes to the young recruits and expressed the hope that the time spent in the Eternal City would be an occasion for a deepening of their faith and an even stronger love for the Church.

(On January 22 this year, the Pontifical Swiss Guards turned 515 years old! Click here for story: Swiss Guards celebrate 515 years – Vatican News)

POPE’S CLOSENESS TO INDIA AS IT STRUGGLES AGAINST COVID-19

Pope Francis has sent a message to Cardinal Oswald Gracias expressing his closeness with the people severely hit by record infections and deaths from Covid.

By Robin Gomes (vaticannews)

Pope Francis has expressed his solidarity and closeness to the people of India, ravaged by the second wave of Covid-19 infections that has overwhelmed its healthcare system.

“At this time when so many in India are suffering as a result of the present health emergency, I am writing to convey my heartfelt solidarity and spiritual closeness to all the Indian people, together with the assurance of my prayers that God will grant healing and consolation to everyone affected by this grave pandemic,” the Pope wrote in a message to Cardinal Oswald Gracias of Bombay, the president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India (CBCI).

The Holy Father particularly expressed his closeness to “the sick and their families, to those who care for them, and in particular to those who are mourning the loss of their loved ones.”

“I think too of the many doctors, nurses, hospital workers, ambulance drivers and those working tirelessly to respond to the immediate needs of their brothers and sisters. With deep appreciation, I invoke upon all of them God’s gifts of perseverance, strength and peace.”

Pope Francis expressed his gratitude to the Catholic Church of India “for its works of charity and fraternal solidarity carried out in the service of all.”

“I think especially of the generosity shown by so many committed young people.  I join you in commending to the Lord’s infinite mercy the faithful who have lost their lives, not least the great numbers of priests and men and women religious.”

“In these days of immense grief, may we all be consoled in the hope born of Easter and our unshakeable faith in Christ’s promise of resurrection and new life,” the Pope concluded, imparting his blessing.

THE ROSARY MARATHON: FEATURED SHRINES MAY 5 TO 11 – CONTEMPLATIVE PRAYER: OUR HEARTS GAZING IN FAITH ON JESUS

In his general audience series of catecheses devoted to prayer, Pope Francis last week spoke of meditative prayer and this week he focused on contemplative prayer. For many the terms might seem interchangeable but there is a difference. I read both papal catecheses to try and understand.

Last week the Pope said, “We all need to meditate, to reflect, to find ourselves. Especially in the voracious Western world, people seek meditation because it represents a high barrier against the daily stress and emptiness that is everywhere.”

He further added that it is “a phenomenon to be welcomed, because we possess an interior life that cannot always be neglected.”

This week, Francis explained, “we now consider contemplative prayer. For Christians, contemplative prayer is an act of the heart by which we fix our gaze in faith upon Jesus, quietly pondering his word and his saving mysteries.”

Our minds and our hearts are surely vessels of these kinds of prayer.

If you search online for an explanation of the two types of prayer and the difference between them, all reliable sites state it this way: “While both are forms of prayer, the fundamental difference between meditation and contemplation is that meditation is a human mode of prayer whereas contemplation is divinely infused. ..”

THE ROSARY MARATHON: FEATURED SHRINES MAY 5 TO 11

Here are three links for viewing the daily rosary recitation at different shrines around the world as people pray for an end to the pandemic. Tune in at 6 pm Rome time:

The Holy See (vatican.va) click on VIDEO

Schedules – Vatican News

News from the Vatican – News about the Church – Vatican News

Here is the May 5 to 11 schedule of shrines from which the rosary will be recited during this prayer marathon for an end to the pandemic. Also listed are the prayer intentions for the day:

May 5. Blessed Virgin of the Rosary (South Korea) – For all children and adolescents

May 6. Our Lady of Aparecida (Brazil) – For all young people

May 7. Our Lady of Peace and Good Voyage (Philippines) – For all families

May 8. Our Lady of Luján (Argentina) – For all communication workers

May 9. Holy House of Loreto (Italia) – For all seniors

May 10. Our Lady of Knock (Ireland) – For all people with disabilities

May 11. Virgin of the Poor (Belgium) – For all the poor, homeless and economically distressed

Click here to view the full list of shrines: April | 2021 | Joan’s Rome (wordpress.com)

CONTEMPLATIVE PRAYER: OUR HEARTS GAZING IN FAITH ON JESUS

Pope Francis began today’s general audience, live-streamed from the papal library of the Apostolic Palace, by explaining that, “in our continuing catechesis on Christian prayer, we now consider contemplative prayer. For Christians, contemplative prayer is an act of the heart by which we fix our gaze in faith upon Jesus, quietly pondering his word and his saving mysteries.”

By way of example of contemplation, Francis underscored what “the simple farmer of Ars told Saint John Vianney: in praying before the Tabernacle, “I look at him and he looks at me”. By gazing on our Lord in this way, we come to feel his loving gaze upon us and our hearts are purified. This in turn enables us to see others in the light of that truth and compassion which Jesus brings to all.” (photo: vatican media)

The Holy Father said, “Christ himself is the model for all contemplative prayer: amid the activity of his public ministry he always found time for a prayer that expressed his loving communion with the Father. At the Transfiguration, Jesus prepared the disciples for his coming passion and death by enabling them to contemplate his divine glory.”

“Through our prayer,” concluded Pope Francis, “may we persevere in union with him on the path of love where contemplation and charity become one. For, as Saint John of the Cross, the Church’s great master of contemplative prayer teaches us: one act of pure love is more useful to the Church than all the other works put together.”

 

POPE DEDICATES MAY PRAYER INTENTION TO “WORLD OF FINANCE”

POPE DEDICATES MAY PRAYER INTENTION TO “WORLD OF FINANCE”

Following is the text of Pope Francis’ video message with his prayer intention for the month of May on the theme “The world of finance: ‘Let us pray that those responsible for finance collaborate with governments to regulate financial markets and protect citizens from its dangers’.”

“While the real economy, the one that creates jobs, is in crisis – how many people are out of work! Financial markets have never been as hypertrophic** as they are now.

How far is the world of big finance from most people’s lives!

Finance, if not regulated, becomes pure speculation animated by monetary policies.

This situation is unsustainable. It’s dangerous

To prevent the poor from again paying the consequences, financial speculation must be strictly regulated.

Speculation. I want to emphasize this term.

Finance is a tool of service, a tool to serve people and to take care of the common home!

We still have time to start a process of global change to put into practice a different, more just, inclusive, sustainable economy that leaves no one behind. Let’s do it!

And let’s pray for finance leaders to work with governments to regulate financial markets and protect citizens in danger.”

Click here for video prepared by Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network of Pope Francis’ May prayer intention with English subtitles: Pope’s May prayer intention: ‘For the world of finance’ – Vatican News

THE VATICAN IN BRIEF

THE VATICAN IN BRIEF

POPE MEETS IRAQI FOREIGN MINISTER – Pope Francis met Monday with Fuad Hussein, foreign affairs minister of Iraq, according to Matteo Bruni, Holy See Press Office director. Responding to questions from journalists, Bruni said Pope Francis recalled with gratitude the welcome he received during his recent March 5 to 8 journey to Iraq. Vaticannews reported that, in the nearly half hour meeting, the Pope also “addressed an affectionate greeting to Iraq and to all its people, reiterating his hope that all people may ‘grow in solidarity and in the ability to acknowledge themselves as responsible for the vulnerabilities of others’.” He was the first-ever Pope to visit the Middle Eastern nation. (Vatican photo)


PAPAL MESSAGE TO PORTUGUESE ALTAR SERVERS – Pope Francis sent a message for the 25th National Pilgrimage of the altar servers of Portugal, urging them to “put the enthusiasm of their age into the encounter of Jesus” and to “be original” as they bring forth the gifts and the unique personal talents the Lord has given them. “Offer your hands, thoughts and time to Jesus,” the Pope wrote in his message. “Our Lady will be happy to see the altar servers around her and that she will whisper to them in the same manner as she did the servants at the first miracle of Jesus at Cana: “Do whatever He tells you. ..Here is the first thing Jesus says to each one of you: be holy.” The pilgrimage took place on May 1 at the shrine of Our Lady of Fatima.

FRANCIS CONFIRMS VOTE TO CANONIZE 7 BLESSEDS – Pope Francis presided at an Ordinary Public Consistory for the Canonization of Blesseds on Monday morning. He confirmed the vote of the Cardinals to proceed with the canonization of seven Blesseds, who will be raised to the altars in the coming weeks and months, according to a schedule to be set at a later time. Once canonized, the holy men and women will be recognised as Saints throughout the universal Church. One martyr is numbered among them, an Indian who, Blessed Lazarus, the first lay person from India to be canonized. For his story and that of Blessed Charles de Foucauld, click here: Pope: Blessed Devasahayam Pillai, six others to be named saints – Vatican News

VATICAN MUSEUMS REOPEN TO PUBLIC AFTER 3RD CLOSURE – The celebrated Museums opened today with many health protocols in place, including thermal scanners, online booking only and managing the flow of visitors to avoid crowding. Vatican news reports that the 7-kilometer-long museums of galleries, halls and corridors are ventilated with windows open to courtyards and garden, and quotes museum director Barbara Jatta: “And so really, the security of our visitors is for sure one of our goals.” The year 2021 marks the 700 anniversary of the death of Dante Alighieri and the Museums will honor the celebrated Italian poet in a special feature. For the full story on the re-opening and the work that the Vatican Museums did during the close down: Vatican Museums reopen to public after 3rd closure – Vatican News    photo by vatican media

THE RENEWED JOY OF DINING OUT IN ROME

THE RENEWED JOY OF DINING OUT IN ROME

On April 26th, restaurants in Italy were finally allowed to open in the evening for dinner, though limited to serving people outside. Still, for most everyone – especially yours truly! – this was a huge step forward because the last time we were allowed to have dinner in a restaurant was October 2020!!

I had dinner at La Vittoria that very night! It was like life had returned to some kind of normal. I went earlier than usual and it was still light out.

For years I’ve had dinner every Friday night at La Vittoria, rewarding myself for a week of work that I always enjoy and always hope is well done! This past Friday – the first Friday since October! – I returned for my favorite fish dinner, ricciola as only Claudio or his son Leonardo can make it. I had to look the name in English – amberjack or yellowtail.   Described as somewhere between tuna and mahi mahi, it is light and buttery and so versatile as it can be baked, fried, broiled, etc. La Vittoria prepares it in a tomato sauce with miniature, very special olives that add a great touch.

What was so very special about last Friday was the good number of people out for dinner, including friends from the Roman Curia and North American College. To hear people chatting away, laughing, the clinking of glasses, was indeed a wonderful treat – Christmas in April!

The weather has not cooperated with restaurant owners this week – a few warm temps but a lot of clouds and some rain.

Today after Mass, I went to Homebaked for my usual (when Covid hasn’t closed places) Sunday brunch – terrific bacon, great French toast, coffee and a mimosa!

Special moments, people and places truly to be savored!

THE MAY PRAYER MARATHON TO END PANDEMIC: LIST OF SHRINES AND DAILY PRAYER INTENTIONS

www.vaticannews.va will be a host for the prayer marathon evening events. In addition many countries will be offering local social media as a place to follow the daily rosary. When possible, EWTN will offer the evening rosary here: (20+) EWTN Vatican | Facebook   This will depend on images arriving from the Vatican or the shrine itself. Transmission may also depend on the language offered (if, for example, an African nation prays in a little known language.)

THE MAY PRAYER MARATHON TO END PANDEMIC: LIST OF SHRINES AND DAILY PRAYER INTENTIONS

The big worldwide rosary marathon for an end to the pandemic starts tomorrow!

The pontifical council that has organized this initiative has prepared a short liturgical guide in Italian, English and Spanish that provides some useful suggestions for sharing this moment in one’s own community. It can be downloaded here: Sussidio Rosario 2021 Inglese.pdf (pcpne.va)

With the exception of the transmission on May 1 from the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham that starts at 7 pm Rome time), in following days the rosary starts at 6 pm Rome time (so check the time difference between Rome and where you live).

The council prayer guide notes three moments that will occur every day at shrines throughout the world:

  1. The Shrine’s Morning Prayer will begin with the symbolic gesture of the lighting of the candle and placed in front of the image of Our Lady. Immediately afterwards, the passage of Scripture taken from chapter eighteen (18) of Saint Luke’s Gospel, from which this sign takes its name, will be proclaimed. The celebrant will then explain the meaning of this gesture and of the day, and will end by praying, with the faithful present, the ancient prayer Sub tuum praesidium addressed to the Virgin Mary.
  2. The Holy Rosary: the highlight of the Shrine’s day of prayer will be the Recitation of the Holy Rosary, prayed according to local traditions and customs, for the end of the pandemic and for the particular daily intention entrusted by Pope Francis, according to the directions provided in the Prayer Calendar.
  3. At the end of the day, all the faithful, gathered at the Shrine, will address a farewell greeting to Mother Mary, ideally, handing over to the next Shrine the prayer baton.

May 1. Our Lady of Walsingham (England) – For all the deceased

 

May 2. Jesus the Saviour and Mother Mary (Nigeria) – For all those who have not been able to say goodbye to their deceased loved ones

May 3. Our Lady of Częstochowa (Poland) – For all those infected with the corona virus and all the sick

May 4. Basilica of the Annunciation (Israel) – For all expectant women and their unborn babies

May 5. Blessed Virgen del Rosario (South Korea) – For all children and adolescents

May 6. Our Lady of Aparecida (Brazil) – For all young people

May 7. Our Lady of Peace and Good Voyage (Philippines) –   For all families

May 8. Our Lady of Luján (Argentina) – For all communication workers

May 9. Holy House of Loreto (Italia) – For all seniors

May 10. Our Lady of Knock (Ireland) – For all people with disabilities

May 11. Virgin of the Poor (Belgium) – For all the poor, homeless and economically distressed

May 12. Our Lady of Africa (Algeria) – For all people who live alone and those who have lost hope

May 13. Blessed Virgen del Rosario (Portugal) – For all prisoners

May 14. Our Lady of Health (India) – For all scientists and medical research institutions

May 15. Our Lady Queen of Peace (Bosnia) – For all migrants

May 16. St. Mary’s Cathedral (Australia) – For all victims of violence and human trafficking

May 17. Immaculate Conception (U.S.A.) – For all world leaders and for all heads of international organizations

May 18. Our Lady of Lourdes (France) – For all doctors and nurses

May 19. Mother Mary’s House (Turkey) – For all people at war and for world peace

May 20. Our Lady of Charity of Copper (Cuba) – For all pharmacists and health care personnel

May 21. Our Lady of Nagasaki (Japan) – For all social workers

May 22. Our Lady of Montserrat (Spain) – For all volunteers

May 23. Our Lady of Cap (Canada) – For all law enforcement and military personnel and for all firefighters

May 24. To be confirmed   – For all those who provide essential services

May 25. Basilica of the Blessed Virgin of Ta’Pinu (Malta) – For all teachers, students and educators

May 26. Our Lady of Guadalupe (Mexico) – For all workers and entrepreneurs

May 27. Mother of God (Ukraine) – For all the unemployed

May 28. Black Madonna of Altötting (Germany) – For the Holy Father, bishops, presbyters, and deacons

May 29. Our Lady of Lebanon (Lebanon) – For all consecrated men and women

May 30. Blessed Virgin of the Holy Rosary of Pompeii (Italia) – For the Church

May 31. Vatican Gardens – For the end of the pandemic and the resumption of our social and economic life.

 

VATICAN INSIDER GOES TO THE GREGORIAN UNIVERSITY – POPE ALLOWS CARDINALS, BISHOPS TO BE TRIED BY VATICAN TRIBUNALS

Weekly English edition of L’Osservatore Romano: ING_2021_018_3004.pdf (osservatoreromano.va)

VATICAN INSIDER GOES TO THE GREGORIAN UNIVERSITY

My guest this week in Vatican Insider’s interview segment is Fr. Mark Lewis, vice rector for Academics at the Jesuit-run Gregorian University in Rome. He tells us about his background and how he got to Rome and the Gregorian. He also teaches Church history at this venerable, centuries-old academic institution located in the very center of Rome.

You’ll learn about Father’s specific work at the university, how it reflects the universal Church in its teaching staff and student body and how the Greg (as we in Rome call the university) has dealt with the pandemic – everything from classes online requiring new technology to turn-styles that measure the temperature of those entering the university. I also ask Father why he thinks Pope Francis was the first ever Jesuit to be elected to the papacy when cardinals of other orders such as Dominicans, Franciscans, etc., have been elected.

Father Lewis is standing in his office by a copy of one of the posters in the university archives that shows how the university, in a long gone past, announced to the city of Rome the doctoral theses to be defended by students. I took several photos including one poster (the one with the word “Bando”) that listed house rules of various sorts, including one that says that there could be no noisy gatherings at Carnival time. There are even rules regarding food and a number of other areas of a student’s life. (Apologies for not taking a better photo of Fr. Mark!)

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IN THE UNITED STATES, you can listen to Vatican Insider (VI) on a Catholic radio station near you (stations listed at www.ewtn.com) or on channel 130 Sirius-XM satellite radio, or on http://www.ewtn.com. OUTSIDE THE U.S., you can listen to EWTN radio on our website home page by clicking on the right side where you see “LISTEN TO EWTN.” VI airs at 5am and 9pm ET on Saturdays and 6am ET on Sundays. On the GB-IE feed (which is on SKY in the UK and Ireland), VI airs at 5:30am, 12 noon and 10pm CET on Sundays. Both of these feeds are also available on the EWTN app and on www.ewtnradio.net ALWAYS CHECK YOUR OWN TIME ZONE! For VI archives: go to https://www.ewtn.com/radio/audio-archive and write the name of the guest for whom you are serarching in the SEARCH box. Below that, will appear “Vatican Insider” – click on that and the link to that particular episode will appear.

POPE ALLOWS CARDINALS, BISHOPS TO BE TRIED BY VATICAN TRIBUNALS

Pope Francis has issued a new Apostolic Letter “motu proprio” that modifies the judicial system in Vatican City State. Until now, cardinals and bishops could only be tried by the “Corte di Cassazone” (Court of Cassation, the Vatican’s Supreme Court), presided over by a cardinal. With the new motu proprio, the Pope allows cardinals and bishops to be tried by a court of first instance, with the stipulation that cases will still have to be authorised by the Supreme Pontiff.

By Vatican News

Cardinals and bishops accused of criminal offences by Vatican magistrates, can now be tried by the Tribunal of the Vatican City State instead of the Court of Cassation presided over by a cardinal, as had been the case until now. Pope Francis made the change in an Apostolic Letter issued motu proprio that amends the judicial system of the Vatican State promulgated in March 2020. However, trials will still require the Pope’s prior authorization before they can proceed.

The change in legislation comes after Francis himself had addressed the issue at the inauguration of the judicial year in the Vatican on March 27. In Friday’s motu proprio, Pope Francis, citing his own words on that occasion, recalls “the overriding need for the current procedural system – also by means of appropriate changes in the law – to ensure the equality of all members of the Church and their equal dignity and position, without privileges that date back to earlier times and are no longer in keeping with the responsibilities that each person has in building up the Church.”

Pope Francis’ decision to abolish Article 24 of the law “on the judicial order of the Vatican City State,” – which provided for cardinals and bishops accused of criminal offences within Vatican City State to have recourse to the Court of Cassation – is therefore based on the principle of the equality of all members of the Church. The Court of Cassation is the Vatican’s Supreme Court, and in such cases would consist of three Cardinals and two or more associate judges.

When the new motu proprio comes into effect (the day after it is promulgated through publication in L’Osservatore Romano), cardinals and bishops put on trial for common criminal offences (i.e., offences not related to the violation of ecclesiastical laws regulated by Canon Law) will therefore be judged like everyone else and by the same Vatican Court, according to the three degrees of adjudication.

The motu proprio also introduces a new paragraph Article 6 of the judicial order: “In cases involving the Most Eminent Cardinals and the Most Excellent Bishops, outside the cases envisaged by canon 1405 § 1, the tribunal judges with the prior consent of the Supreme Pontiff.”

What remains unchanged is the need for prior authorisation from the Pope before cardinals and bishops can be tried. The new provisions are similar to procedures in States that require authorization from parliaments in order to try heads of state or government ministers.

Follow the link for the full text (in Italian) of the Apostolic Letter “amending the jurisdiction of the judicial bodies of the Vatican City State.”

ST. CATHERINE OF SIENA: WHEN SHE SPOKE, POPES LISTENED

I last visited Siena in June 2016 with a group of women from WINE, Women in the New Evangelization, and wrote the following account of our visit. We had a truly memorable day in this picturesque, historic, medieval Tuscan hill town, as you will see in some of my photos. And you just have to love Catherine of Siena! Here I am with Kelly Wahlquist, founder of WINE, and Teresa Tomeo!

CATHERINE OF SIENA: WHEN SHE SPOKE, POPES LISTENED

Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380), Third Order Dominican, scholar, philosopher, theologian, mystic, spiritual writer, co-patron of Italy with St. Francis of Assisi and a Doctor of the Church.

What an astonishing, wonderful story, what a remarkable and inspirational woman was St. Catherine. I truly felt her presence everywhere we visited in Siena and am now starting to read the two books I bought – her “Letters” and also “The Dialogues,” her spiritual legacy.

Catherine was the 23rd child of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa, a well off couple – Jacopo was a fabric dyer – of Siena. A number of her siblings, including a twin sister, did not survive to adulthood. (from Franciscan media: Painting of Saint Catherine of Siena | Siena Cathedral Choir | photo by Sailko)

They lived, as you will see, in a very large home in hilly Siena with fabulous views of the city and outlying countryside.

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Her home –

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One of the plaques I photographed points to the fact that St. Therese of Jesus and St. Catherine of Siena were the first two women whom Popes named as Doctors of the Church.

Two other photos show a very ornately decorated room – the Benincasa family dining room!

Biographies state that Catherine was lively, curious, cheerful, fun-loving and intelligent and very religious.

From an EWTN bio: When Catherine was twelve, her mother, with marriage in mind, began to urge her to pay more attention to her appearance. To please her mother and sister, she dressed in the bright gowns and jewels that were fashionable for young girls. Soon she repented of this vanity, and declared with finality that she would never marry. When her parents persisted in their talk about finding her a husband, she cut off the golden-brown hair that was her chief beauty As punishment, she was now made to do menial work in the household, and the family, knowing she craved solitude, never allowed her to be alone.

Catherine bore all this with sweetness and patience. Long afterwards, in “The Dialogue,” she wrote that God had shown her how to build in her soul a private cell where no tribulation could enter. Catherine disappointed her mother by cutting off her hair as a protest against being overly encouraged to improve her appearance in order to attract a husband. Her father ordered her to be left in peace, and she was given a room of her own for prayer and meditation.”

“…..In the small, dimly-lighted room now set apart for her use, a cell nine feet by three, she gave herself up to prayers and fasting; she scourged herself three times daily with an iron chain, and slept on a board. At first she wore a hair shirt, subsequently replacing it by an iron-spiked girdle. Soon she obtained what she ardently desired, permission to assume the black habit of a Dominican tertiary, which was customarily granted only to matrons or widows. She now increased her asceticism, eating and sleeping very little. For three years she spoke only to her confessor and never went out except to the neighboring church of St. Dominic, where the pillar against which she used to lean is still pointed out to visitors.”

“….The years of solitude and preparation were ended and soon afterwards she began to mix with her fellow men and learn to serve them. Like other Dominican tertiaries, she volunteered to nurse the sick in the city hospitals, choosing those afflicted with loathsome diseases—cases from which others were apt to shrink. There gathered around this strong personality a band of earnest associates….”

“….Her pity for dying men was not confined to those who were sick. She made it a practice to visit condemned persons in prison, hoping to persuade them to make their peace with God. On one occasion she walked to the scaffold with a young Perugian knight, sentenced to death for using seditious language against the government of Siena. His last words were: ‘Jesus and Catherine!’”

And Popes listened to this singularly remarkable woman…

“….Many of the troubles which then afflicted Europe were, to some degree at least, due to the seventy-four-year residence of the popes at Avignon, where the Curia was now largely French. Gregory had been ready to go back to Rome with his court, but the opposition of the French cardinals had deterred him. Since in her letters Catherine had urged his return so strongly, it was natural that they should discuss the subject now that they were face to face. “Fulfill what you have promised,” she said, reminding him of a vow he had once taken and had never disclosed to any human being. Greatly impressed by what he regarded as a supernatural sign, Gregory resolved to act upon it at once.

“On September 13, 1376, he set out from Avignon to travel by water to Rome, while Catherine and her friends left the city on the same day to return overland to Siena. On reaching Genoa she was detained by the illness of two of her secretaries, Neri di Landoccio and Stephen Maconi. The latter was a young Sienese nobleman, recently converted, who had become an ardent follower. When Catherine got back to Siena, she kept on writing the Pope, entreating him to labor for peace. At his request she went again to Florence, still rent by factions, and stayed there for some time, frequently in danger of her life. She did finally establish peace between the city governors and the papacy, but this was in the reign of Gregory’s successor.

“After Catherine returned to Siena, Raymund of Capua tells us, ‘she occupied herself actively in the composition of a book which she dictated under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost’. This was the mystical work, in four treatises, called The Dialogue of St. Catherine. Her health was now so impaired by austerities that she was never free from pain; yet her thin face was usually smiling. She was grieved by any sort of scandal in the Church, especially that of the Great Schism which followed the death of Gregory XI. Urban VI was elected as his successor by the cardinals of Rome and Clement VII by the rebellious cardinals of Avignon.

“Western Christendom was divided; Clement was recognized by France, Spain, Scotland, and Naples; Urban by most of North Italy, England, Flanders, and Hungary. Catherine wore herself out trying to heal this terrible breach in Christian unity and to obtain for Urban the obedience due to the legitimate head. Letter after letter was dispatched to the princes and leaders of Europe. To Urban himself she wrote to warn him to control his harsh and arrogant temper. This was the second pope she had counseled, chided, even commanded. Far from resenting reproof, Urban summoned her to Rome that he might profit by her advice. Reluctantly she left Siena to live in the Holy City. She had achieved a remarkable position for a woman of her time. On various occasions at Siena, Avignon, and Genoa, learned theologians had questioned her and had been humbled by the wisdom of her replies.

“Although Catherine was only thirty-three, her life was now nearing its close. On April 21, 1380, a paralytic stroke made her helpless from the waist downwards, and eight days later she passed away in the arms of her cherished friend, Alessia Saracini. The Dominicans at Rome still treasure the body of Catherine in the Minerva Church, but Siena has her head enshrined in St. Dominic’s Church.” (Saint Catherine of Siena, Virgin | EWTN)